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Question Regarding Turbo Boost Voltage

Time:2019-01-11 03:50Turbochargers information Click:

Turbo Boost question Regarding

The turbo boost is designed to provide extra performance while keeping the processor within its TDP, not to use the lowest voltage possible. Sure it's possible to get 4.2+ Ghz on 1.3 volts but it may not be completely stable and over time it will become unstable. Intel warranties their processors as being stable so the stock settings for normal and turbo operation leaves quite a bit of voltage headroom at all times.

Yeoman1000

Okidoke, thanks for that.

I'll probably leave it disabled until I would want to overclock it manually myself (if i ever choose to).

Why would such an overclock become unstable overtime? Would it just be general 'old age', or does the overclock (even a modest one) quickly eat away at the processors 'endurance'?

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Pinhedd

Yeoman1000 said:

Okidoke, thanks for that.

I'll probably leave it disabled until I would want to overclock it manually myself (if i ever choose to).

Why would such an overclock become unstable overtime? Would it just be general 'old age', or does the overclock (even a modest one) quickly eat away at the processors 'endurance'?



Processors degrade over time due to electromigration, a process that degrades the conductive electrical paths. It's very similar to the way engines in vehicles wear out due to friction. Electromigration occurs in all electrical devices but is particularly strong in semiconductors due to their drastically lower conductivity. It also scales exponentially with voltage and temperature. This is why overclocked devices will fail sooner than devices that are run within the manufacturer's specifications.

Intel warranties their processors for 3 years so long as the device is kept within the electrical and thermal specifications set out in the manufacturer's datasheet. Despite being warrantied for 3 years, most should have at least a 10 year lifespan which means that they will be replaced long before they fail. Mild overclocking such as that performed by turbo boost might reduce this to 8 years of moderate usage, still long enough to last through the warranty and be replaced by the overwhelming majority of users. Moderate overclocking such as the common 4Ghz+ on current generation Sandybridge chips should still see between 3 and 5 years of lifespan before failure. This kind of overclocking is not covered under normal factory warranty but can be covered with the Intel performance tuning plan.

Excessive overclocking beyond 4.5Ghz will often reduce the lifespan to less than 3 years with many failures happening within 2 years or less on lower end chips. Most people who run their components in this range replace their computer every couple of years anyway.

Extreme overclocking in the 5Ghz+ range will result in failure within months on most chips.

The lifespan of each chip depends on the quality of the chip itself and the condition it is run in. Temperatures below 70 degrees centigrade are fine at all times but temperatures beyond 85 should not be sustained for long. Similarly, voltages above the absolute maximum specified by Intel (absolute maximum voltage is different from the maximum standard voltage) should not be used without extreme caution.

Overclocking can be fun and it's a great way to get to know how PC internals work together. However, it has its risks and the risks are all too often ignored on these forums. If reasonable care is taken then the risks can usually be mitigated.

You can leave Turbo Boost on if you'd like. It's pretty harmless and its operation is warrantied by Intel.

k1114

That is high voltage for turbo, mines only 1.21 enabled. Maybe you're mistaking the auto ocer. Use cpuz to see your actual speed. Also turbo is only .1 ghz on all cores.

If you got those lifespan expectations from release datasheets, current reports are showing they're lasting much longer. The average oc is ~4.5ghz and is expected to last 4-5 years. There have been a couple of posts of 4.7ghz+ becoming unstable and needing a voltage raise but there are still people running 5ghz since day 1 and it's been over a year.

Pinhedd

My data is several years old but it really hasn't changed that much. Intel's EIST greatly reduced the degradation of chips by running them at full speed only when the load requires it. 5Ghz 24/7 is different than 1600Mhz 20/7 and 5Ghz 4/7. The multiple multipliers change things a bit.

When I say "most chips" I mean "most chips" and not "top binned performance chips". I also don't discriminate between AMD and Intel and prefer to err on the side of caution. Naturally, anyone who has the time and money to invest in a proper overclock will be able to squeeze significantly more performance and lifespan out of the product.

Sandybridge has only been out for a year and a half but the failure distribution isn't flat, it's going to be heavily clustered around a timeframe which is still in the future. Given that Intel's IMC appears to be the weakpoint in many chips (not surprising considering that the memory controller was also the weakpoint on most LGA 775 platforms) I wouldn't be surprised if there's a huge influx of failures 12-18 months from now when Haswell hits the market.

Yeoman1000

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